How to: The Snacks & Kitchen Box

From my teenager to my three-year-old, our family is using German together. 


– Elizabeth Klemm –

My kids spoke Italian to their Nonno (Grandpa). He was shocked at first and then teary-eyed as none of his grandchildren have ever spoken Italian.

– Kimberly Toti – 

My kids are having actual conversations around the kitchen table… in Hebrew!

– Judy Rich-

Challenge 1: Snack Time


Are you ready to talk together in another language?! 🥳 Starting today, you’ll use full sentences together—going beyond memorizing vocabulary words because… you’ll be using vocabulary in grammatically correct sentences! All while snacking. Easy and yummy. 🤤

Using phrases from the beginning to the end of snack time will increase your recall, prompt you to use the language whenever you’re snacking (aka all the time), and allow you to hold a conversation in another language. And most phrases are transferable to mealtime. 💁🏻‍♀️ So let’s start whining, “I’m hungry,” in another language! 🤗

Working through the Challenge

  • Start with the replies to questions in different sections. Then work on the questions. Add additional phrases from there.
  • Older children: Ask your parent if they want a snack whenever you get yourself one.
  • Younger children: It’s okay to start by saying a word or two as you learn.

Talking to one person vs. two or more people changes how you say a phrase. Start by addressing one person at a time.

We recommend starting with honorific phrases. Many Korean families teach their children to talk this way.

When to move on to the Next Challenge

According to your pacing, spend 1 – 4 weeks in this challenge completing as many practice sessions as comfortable for your family. When your time is up, move on to the next challenge. See more details here.

Challenge 2: The Snack Chart


Not only does this challenge have fun illustrations for you to quickly find the snacks you want to eat and share, but you’ll distinctly see the different parts of sentences as you build them. 👷🏼‍♀️ Plus, tasty snacks = more talking! 🤩

You’ll feel your confidence grow as you easily use phrases you already know with new vocabulary and expand on the vocabulary you already know with new phrases. 🤸🏾‍♂️

As you snack, you’ll naturally familiarize yourself with patterns and exceptions, which are foundational for fluently (easily and accurately) building your own sentences! 👸🏽🤴🏼

Working through the Challenge

  • Start with foods you have and stock up on some of your child’s favorite snacks so they can ask for them.
  • Older children: Ask your parent if they want snacks that you know aren’t their favorite. 
  • Younger children: Nod or shake your head as your parent brushes your teeth at night and asks if you ate certain foods today.

In gendered languages where the article  “a” changes to match the gender of the item, use your phrases so often that you naturally know which word to use—just like a native speaker.

You’ll notice that “apple” and “apples” are the same word. Food items don’t have both singular and plural forms. Like, popcorn and broccoli in English!

When to move on to the Next Challenge

According to your pacing, spend 1 – 4 weeks in this challenge completing as many practice sessions as comfortable for your family. When your time is up, move on to the next challenge. See more details here.

Challenge 3: Kitchen Label Cards


The requests, questions, and responses on these label cards transform using common kitchen items into powerful experiences that make the phrases second nature—trumping rote memorization. 🤓 You’ll gain an ear for diverse grammatical patterns and be able to use these sentence structures outside the kitchen! 🏄🏽‍♀️

With over 40 cards, you choose what works for your kitchen and put your current cards next to the items, which reminds you to use your phrases! ⏰ All of these phrases require action or visible information, fast-tracking the connection between what’s being said and what it means. ⚡️

Working through the Challenge

  • Only work on one to a few cards at a time. 
  • Start with a phrase that is similar across a couple of cards. Then work on the next phrase for those cards. As you build confidence, work on more varied phrases.
  • Kids: Choose one person to be the “chore boss.” The boss says the phrase and someone else does the chore. Rotate chore boss.

Kitchens have historically been unfitted (the pieces aren’t built into the room) and are still evolving to fitted kitchens in many countries, so words like “counter” and “pantry” are also evolving.

The kitchen is an intimate gathering place for a family, so the names of kitchen items sometimes vary from one household to another.

When to move on to the Next Box

According to your pacing, spend 1 – 4 weeks in this challenge completing as many practice sessions as comfortable for your family. When your time is up, move on to the next box. See more details here.