How to say, “Don’t wipe your boogers on your shirt” in German. Phrase of the Day!

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Raise your hand if you’ve ever had a kid wipe a booger on their shirt… or better (worse?) yet, your shirt! Eeeww!! Today’s phrase, “Don’t wipe your boogers on your shirt,” is exactly what you may need. You know your kids will get a kick out of learning how to say, “boogers,” in another language! LOL

This is definitely a phrase that had to make the list for Fathers because it grosses Hector out so much, and he says it with so much pain in his voice. 😂

 

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Today’s dad phrase is, “Don’t wipe your
boogers on your shirt.”

And we’re going to be doing that phrase in a foreign language.

Eww, on your own shirt. Gross, Darian.

If you want to follow along- That one has the Corona-virus. Leave the facility.

Oh, is that another way you can get it?

Okay. If you want to follow along in the new language of

your choice for free, you can get the Phrase of the Day

calendar. Just comment or DM us.
Hey, is it okay to touch

my hair?

No, it is not okay.

All right, so, “Don’t wipe your boogers on your shirt.”

Darian, can use the random language generator, so we can see

what language you’re going to be doing this in?

All right, we’re going to be doing it in German.

So let’s do this.

If you already have the $35 phrasebook, you can follow along

in the language of your choice.
To get to it, and to practice

with us in German,

we’re going to go to “B” for “Boogers.”
Or bad boy. Bad boy?

I’m a bad boy.

Oh my gosh. Okay. “Boogers”

Okay, I’m there. And then again the phrase is, “Don’t wipe your boogers

on your shirt.”

Here it is. Eww.

“Schmier” “Schmier”

“deine” “deine” “Popel” “Popel” “nicht” “nicht” “nicht” “nicht”

“an” “an” “dein” “dein” “T-Shirt.” “T-Shirt.”

“Schmier deine Popel nicht an dein T-Shirt.”
“Schmier deine Popel nicht an dein T-Shirt.”

Now I, I told Darian, I told Darian, Darian, “Nicht” when he said “micht”

because he just heard it wrong, and

that’s okay.

But just to point out you don’t want to be correcting your

child when they, like, can’t hear, and they miss, like, like they’re

just starting, and they can’t hear all the sounds being said

Darian just wasn’t listening all the way.

So I gave him another opportunity to hear it.

I just wanted to make that, that distinction in it because

when you’re starting you can’t hear all the sounds being

said, and if you tell your kids, like, no it’s said like this,

they can’t hear it yet.
Yeah. That’s just not fun.

Yeah, they can’t hear it yet.

But you just miss heard it, and

I know, you know the word “nicht,” so I was okay saying that to you.

Yeah, so, “Schmier deine Popel nicht an dein T-Shirt.”

Gross. Okay.

So to teach your child this phrase you would use this when

they wipe that booger on their shirt.

Then you can say it again in English, and then in, in German

again. Hopefully you don’t have too many opportunities to

use this, but this is something that Hector definitely says

too much, too much about that.

There’s always like, this kind of thing happening, right? That’s

Nolan with his napkin.

Yeah, or with your shirt? Yeah, I often see, no, I often

see all, all y’all. Learning that. They’re

trying to learn from Mary Manners to not do things like that. I hate it.

You love it.

And then the babies is like this. Tag us in Instagram stories @talkboxmom

if you’re using this phrase.
Bye.

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